Insomnia

I haven’t written in a while (poetry that is), and so, I decided to get back in the game. The topic is something I’ve been experiencing lately – the inability to sleep.


Insomnia


The darkness has finally taken hold.
Pitiless is the night – still and cold.
I lie awake, my breath runs deep,
struggling to locate a peaceful sleep.

Curled up like a spool, I toss and turn
while my fevered body continues to burn.
Beads of perspiration slowly slide
down the contours of Nocturnal’s bride.

A blessing or a curse, I yet not know.
The sands of time has stopped its flow.
My fatigue wears on, a night so long,
I listen as Silence sings my song.

A warped sense of reality now consumes
all consciousness. I cannot resume
Life’s broken clock. So patiently, I wait
for another miracle dawn to break.

43 Comments

  1. I used “nocturnal’s bride” because I felt I was ‘married’ to the night, so to speak. Unless there is another meaning to “nocturne” that I am unaware of, I don’t think using it is as appropriate.

    PS thanks for the comments (=

    Reply

  2. “nocturne” literally means a kind of music composition, but it’s a music composition that is a metaphor for the night, so I think it should be able to carry the same poetic meaning in that line. Anyhow, the poem isn’t written to a strict meter / scansion, so it doesn’t really matter.

    Reply

  3. Rattle is a poetry magazine and County is a poem of mine published by them. The poem is on their web site and somebody named Amy Lee wrote a ditzy poem underneath it in the comments section. Sorry, it must have been some other bimbo.

    Reply

  4. I hate to tell you this, Almost-half-way-to-forty, but when you call yourself aimzy waimzy and your main concern in life is that your mom is reading your diary, you label yourself a bimbo. You sure are pretty, though! My name is Mather Schneider, mathereider@cox.net. The only reason I stopped here was because I thought you were someone else. I doubt I’ll be coming back. Good luck with the rhyming.

    Reply

  5. “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
    By any other name would smell as sweet.”

    — You don’t know me, yet you’re quick to draw falsified conclusions about my person based on my choice of handle. Having my privacy invaded by someone is hardly my _main concern_, but I think you would agree that it is nevertheless, _a_ concern. So, no. I did not label myself a bimbo, and I object to anyone who does.

    Thank you for dropping by.

    Reply

  6. Sorry, whenever you respond I get an email and when I look I pretty much can’t resist writing something. In my opinion, the point, Aimzy, is that you SHOULD have to outsmart your mom, and if you can’t, which is exactly what she wants, then you might as well live with her until you’re ALL THE WAY to forty. Where are you? Why does it say five o’clock in the evening?

    Reply

  7. It is 1818 hours. I’m in South Africa ¬.¬ (Not my personal choice of residence)

    No, mothers are biologically programmed to protect their offsprings – not invade them. Of everyone in this world, the one person I should be able to trust, is her. I guess something went wrong somewhere along the line. Now I have to implement Sneak Attack v3.0 (which, by the way, is already in effect) >:’)

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  8. 1818 hours? Are you a military brat? Your mother probably thinks that by invading your privacy she IS protecting you. Most mothers just don’t get beyond this basic biology, that’s what makes them good mothers, up until their children are about eighteen or so. They can’t let their children go, it’s natural, especially when money is not a problem. If mother birds had enough to eat they’d never kick their kids out of the nest. But, it gets tiring feeding them. My guess is you’re from money, which makes it almost impossible for you to get out from under her. Plus, I would guess her life must be pretty empty and she must be terrified of life if she is so intent on spying on you, which makes for a couple of generations (at least) of sadness. Money does this to people, among other things.

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  9. No, I’m not a military brat. My parents are not rich. I think this has more to do with me being an only child. Have you heard Britney Spears’ “Overprotected”? v. cool song.

    Reply

  10. What would make you say 1818 hours? Is this a common way to say the time in South Africa? Are you South African? No, I never heard that song.

    Reply

    1. I like being different. (:

      I’m Chinese (b. in Shanghai)

      The lyrics to Overprotected pretty much took the words right out of my mouth.
      “Say hello to the girl that I am.
      You’re gonna have to see through my perspective.
      I need to make mistakes just to learn who I am,
      and I don’t want to be so damn protected.
      (blah blah blah)
      I tell ’em what I like, what I will, and what I don’t.
      But everytime I do, I stand corrected.
      Things that I’ve been told,
      I can’t believe what I hear about the world.
      I realise I’m overprotected.”

  11. It’s actually easier to rhyme in chinese than in english. Most traditional poems have a rhyme scheme of a, a, b, a. In fact, it is relatively easy to write a poem that rhymes all the way through (ie every line ends with the same sound)

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  12. This is the way latin languages are too, like Spanish, every other word rhymes, it is homogenous and pure, but English, no. English is not built to rhyme, and when rhyme is forced upon it, it sounds too harnessed. The power of English can’t emerge in rhyming poetry, or what power that can emerge has already emerged by the cannonic poets of the past. New English poetry has to draw its power from somewher else, I believe. There is such a wealth and well of imagery that English can draw from! The street language, the slang, the histroy. Just look at the English dictionary, which is so BIG! And all the words that aren’t even in there.

    Well, I think I saw another photo of you on the net there! Wowzers! You got a boyfriend?

    Reply

  13. Spanish is musical and Spanish culture is very sex oriented, so somehow the language is sexy too, yes. What does “:-D” mean? Edgar Allen Poe is someone who is basic to any American writer’s/reader’s background, very good, yes. He’s read at a very young age in school, like around 10 or 11, and most people just stop right there. Poe is the beginning, but so much has come after him.

    I’m old, I’m almost all the way to forty, so your fantasy about us can stop right now.

    Reply

  14. :-D it’s a smiley face. Rotate the page 90 degrees to the right and you’ll see.

    Wow, almost 40. That is pretty ancient. Don’t worry, I already have someone else to fantasize about. (:

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  15. I’m not worried. I’m sure whoever it is, they’re fantasizing about you too. You’ve got a long time to live yet, to grow up, and I hope you get out from under your mother. Check out Rattle, Slipstream, Nerve Cowboy, My Favorite Bullet, Silt Reader, Chiron Review, Five A.M., New York Quarterly for good American English poetry.

    Reply

  16. Well, you took the time to check out the poem and confirm that it wasn’t you who wrote the comment. How many Amy Lees are there in the world? Too many. It’s hard to take seriously the criticism of someone who thinks Brittney Spears is a poet, but thanks for the attention anyway. Prose broken into lines and stanzas is pretty much what poetry is. The rhythm and music of the poetry is imbedded in the lines and the way the poem is spoken, which is what the line breaks are for. It’s not that profound, just a matter of taste. Good prose, like Henry Miller or Celine, has more poetry in it that most poets have in their poetry. The lines between genres are definitely blurred, as is right and natural, because it’s the lines and definitions that are faulty and limiting. Good work is good work. But, thank you for the compliment. Sorry I thought you were that other Amy Lee. I’m still on the look-out for her!

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  17. lol Britney doesn’t write the lyrics to her songs. Professional song writers do. :P And just on a side note, Amy’s not really my name (HA!) I picked it when I moved to SA for conveniance’s sake.

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  18. Haha yes I have a funny accent >_> I’ll most probably be here for another 6 years. I want to emigrate to the US. I hear California is really nice. Maybe I’ll bag myself a rich hubby :P

    Reply

  19. Yikes! That sounds scary. To go through that and still come out with some semblance of your original self, I guess that’s the challenge, right? Good luck, chica.

    Reply

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